Is a 3rd generation Shih Tzu puppy of good standard?

I am thinking of buying a Shih Tzu Puppy, but is is only of 3rd generation. It is not for show or breeding. but my partner is insistant on getting a pedigree Shih Tzu. Is this still pedigree? She wants them to have a typical Shih Tzu temperment.

I’m not quite sure what you mean by only of 3rd generation. However, if you mean you’ve only seen a 3-generation pedigree, that just means the breeder either doesn’t have the pedigree information any further back, or she’s not bothered to take it back any further, on paper. It’s quite easy, with the necessary registration details, to extend a pedigree to the more normally seen 5-generations - and I’ve taken the pedigrees of my foundation b itch and stud dog, back 10 generations, on paper.

Only seeing 3 generations on a pedigree is no indication of quality, or otherwise. Any dog, provided the information is known, has a pedigree, even a mongrel. What a mongrel won’t have, as opposed to a purebred, is a registered history going back generations, perhaps to the beginning of the breed itself.

And having registered paperwork isn’t any guarantee of quality. And as a matter of fact, neither is a pedigree that’s full of red print, much as logically it should be. In reality, quite often the brother, or sister of a multi-Champion actually produces the better offspring, especially when put to the right partner. It’s quite possible for a top winning animal never to throw as good as himself, for whatever reason - and it always takes two to tango.

So bottom line here - if the puppy has registered paperwork, it will be purebred. And the pedigree will be interesting - if only so you can check that there’s no direct inbreeding going on, which can often mean problems could arise. It’s far better to find, and buy your puppy from a known good breeder, with a reputation within the breed for producing sound healthy puppies.

2 Responses to “Is a 3rd generation Shih Tzu puppy of good standard?”

  1. WyrDachsie says:

    Having a 3 generation pedigree, only means that the dog is a purebred dog, it does not mean quality. Now, the big question is, how many Champions are in that 3 generation pedigree? that will tell you if the dog is of "good standard"
    References :

  2. MamaBas says:

    I’m not quite sure what you mean by only of 3rd generation. However, if you mean you’ve only seen a 3-generation pedigree, that just means the breeder either doesn’t have the pedigree information any further back, or she’s not bothered to take it back any further, on paper. It’s quite easy, with the necessary registration details, to extend a pedigree to the more normally seen 5-generations - and I’ve taken the pedigrees of my foundation b itch and stud dog, back 10 generations, on paper.

    Only seeing 3 generations on a pedigree is no indication of quality, or otherwise. Any dog, provided the information is known, has a pedigree, even a mongrel. What a mongrel won’t have, as opposed to a purebred, is a registered history going back generations, perhaps to the beginning of the breed itself.

    And having registered paperwork isn’t any guarantee of quality. And as a matter of fact, neither is a pedigree that’s full of red print, much as logically it should be. In reality, quite often the brother, or sister of a multi-Champion actually produces the better offspring, especially when put to the right partner. It’s quite possible for a top winning animal never to throw as good as himself, for whatever reason - and it always takes two to tango.

    So bottom line here - if the puppy has registered paperwork, it will be purebred. And the pedigree will be interesting - if only so you can check that there’s no direct inbreeding going on, which can often mean problems could arise. It’s far better to find, and buy your puppy from a known good breeder, with a reputation within the breed for producing sound healthy puppies.
    References :

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